NCDs

Definition of the Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) by the WHO
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs355/en/
Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), also known as chronic diseases, tend to be of long duration and are the result of a combination of genetic, physiological, environmental and behaviours factors. The main types of NCDs are cardiovascular diseases (like heart attacks and stroke), cancers, chronic respiratory diseases (such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma) and diabetes. NCDs disproportionately affect people in low- and middle-income countries where more than three quarters of global NCD deaths – 31 million – occur.

Key facts (Updated by WHO April 2017)

  • Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) kill 40 million people each year, equivalent to 70% of all deaths globally.
  • Each year, 17 million people die from a NCD before the age of 70; 87% of these “premature” deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.
  • Cardiovascular diseases account for most NCD deaths, or 17.7 million people annually, followed by cancers (8.8 million), respiratory diseases (3.9million), and diabetes (1.6 million).
  • These 4 groups of diseases account for 81% of all NCD deaths.
  • Tobacco use, physical inactivity, the harmful use of alcohol and unhealthy diets all increase the risk of dying from a NCD.
  • Detection, screening and treatment of NCDs, as well as palliative care, are key components of the response to NCDs.

The cost of a polluted environment: 1.7 million child deaths a year
6 March 2017 | WHO, GENEVA – More than 1 in 4 deaths of children under 5 years of age are attributable to unhealthy environments. Every year, environmental risks – such as indoor and outdoor air pollution, second-hand smoke, unsafe water, lack of sanitation, and inadequate hygiene – take the lives of 1.7 million children under 5 years, say two new WHO reports.
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2017/pollution-child-death/en/

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